Just Get Started: Something You Can Use Right Away

As promised, this next video talks about the importance of just starting somewhere. 

If you missed the first video, check that out before you watch this one. 

The video below includes ideas you can try right away. Just get started! Or, if you’re trucking along, make a commitment to take things to next level. Leave a comment below about what you’re up to or what you’re planning to try. Let’s encourage each other!

Rooting for you,

Erica 

P.S. Have you registered yet for the LIVE webinar later this week? I hope you can join me as I talk about The 3 Most Important Topics to Address with Seniors Before They Graduate.

Click here for instant access to the FREE resources I mention in the video.

Don’t forget to leave a comment below!

Is Transformation Possible?

I’m rolling out some FREE, fun things this week, and this video below is the first!

When it comes to equipping students for life after college, it’s easy to doubt our own efforts. We may wonder: Are we even making a difference?

In this video, I talk about how we started small. Very small. We didn’t quite know what we were doing, and we certainly doubted if we were making a difference.

But things didn’t stay that way forever.

I hope this video encourages you to get started or keep going, no matter how small or seemingly insignificant your attempts may feel right now.

Growth and transformation in your own work — and in the lives of students — is possible!

Don’t forget to leave a comment below, and subscribe on the right if you don’t want to miss out on the next video.

I’d love to hear from you!

-Erica

PS: Oh, one more thing you won’t want to miss: I’m hosting a FREE, live webinar later this week on The 3 Most Important Topics to Address with College Seniors Before They Graduate. Check it out, and hope to see you there!

5 Mistakes to Avoid When Equipping Students for Life After College

Click here for FREE access to downloadable PDF.

Many years ago, when my team and I started equipping students to thrive after college, we felt like we were creating in the dark. There were not many resources out there – for students or for those who work with them. We did a lot of building from the ground up, spun our wheels many times, and learned from the burn. 

I want to save you time and the frustration of spinning your wheels. Or, if you’re trucking along, I want to help you maximize your efforts and bring them to the next level. 

If you want to learn some of the pitfalls leaders should watch out for as well as how to turn the opposite actions into best practices, check out the attached PDF: 5 Mistakes to Avoid When Equipping Students for Life after College. Click here, so you can discover what they are. 

Oh, one more thing. There’s more good stuff on the way! Keep your eyes on your inbox so you don’t miss out. 🙂

Now is the time to prepare students to thrive after college!

Rooting for you,

-Erica 

Are You Turning This Perceived Weakness into a Strength for Students?

Let me guess: Often, you feel like you’re in an uphill battle. You’re trying to convince students to take advantage of resources you have to offer, but they don’t know what they don’t know, so they opt out.

I get it. I’ve been just as frustrated, but I’ve also learned that there’s something we can do about it.

Instead of blaming students, we can work to alter their perceptions and normalize the help-seeking process for them.

Do your students perceive the need for help as something for the weak, remedial, or those who can’t figure things out on their own?

Let’s work to change this perceived weakness into a strength!

Successful Students Seek Help

In Thriving in Transitions, one of the contributors, Jillian Kinzie, talks about the importance of normalizing the help-seeking process for students. She writes,

“Students in transition need to not know only the campus resources that are available and how to access them, but also that successful students seek out those resources(p. 15).

Let’s show our students that strong and successful people seek out help.

Normalizing the Help-Seeking Process

Alumni panels are great place to feature individuals who have sought help along the way to their success.

I’ll never forget the time one of our alumnae panelists shared how she started seeing a personal counselor during her first year out of college. Her parents recent divorce coupled with the many stressors of the transition brought her to a place need. Sasha’s* vulnerability on the panel led to a student approaching me later on, confessing that she too had been struggling with a similar situation of her own parent’s divorce, among other issues. She asked, “Where can I get some professional help?”

When we normalize the help-seeking process, struggling students feel empowered to get what they need to thrive.

Putting This into Practice

If you are not in these roles already, show your students that successful students…

  • …seek out professors during office hours. These visits can foster academic success and build relational capital, which is crucial for life after college.
  • …seek out career and calling services/centers on campus. Help students avoid the April panic (Oh no! I’m graduating, and I don’t have a job!), and preemptively invite students into a career preparation process.
  • …seek out multi-generational relationships at church or elsewhere. Life after college is filled with generational diversity. Let’s prepare our students by encouraging cross-generational connections now.

Can you invite some former students to share how the help-seeking process has shaped them into the thriving alumni they are today?

I’m taking my own advice, and I invited two former ENGL 15 students to share their experiences with my current writing students this week. These two students made the most of the resources available to them; I want to show my current students that strong students seek help!

What’s one way you plan to normalize the help-seeking process for your students? Leave a comment below!

P.S. Speaking of help-seeking, where are you stuck when it comes to equipping students to thrive after college? I’m here to help! I’d love to chat for 15-20 minutes. Click here, and we’ll find a time!

*Name changed to protect privacy.

5 Strategies for Honoring Graduating Seniors

Believe it or not, graduation is almost upon us! Let’s make these weeks count, especially with our graduating seniors. Here’s an article (from the archives) to get us thinking about how to best serve seniors in their last stretch. Don’t forgot to pop back to the blog here to share about one way you plan to honor the college seniors on your campus!

What Students Need, Companies Want, and We Can Cultivate

In light of my last post on pirates and child-like play, I thought this article (from the archives) would be the perfect follow-up. Can you guess what top quality makes college seniors successful in their transition and employers eager to hire? 

Find out here!

After you read the article, don’t forget to stop back to leave a comment about one thing that stands out to you or how you’re working to nourish this quality with your students!

Pirates Don’t Use Computers

While playing an imaginary game with my four-year-old son, I slipped onto to my computer to check what felt like a very time-sensitive email at the time. He quickly caught me and chided me with these words, “Pirates don’t use computers!” He wanted us to play, have an adventure, and find the lost treasure! My screen was both anachronistic and annoying in his pirate world.

So true. Though this was just moment with my child on an ordinary Tuesday, it made me think not only about how we use technology wisely but also about how well I play. With my son. And with my students.

Not long after this incident, my son’s preschool teacher loaned me a short book called Play Like a Pirate by Quinn Rollins. Our little parent-teacher conference led to a conversation on pedagogy, and before you think we were taking ourselves way too seriously for a meeting about four-year-olds, I should say that our discussion was all about play!

I cruised through the book, and even though Play Like a Pirate is geared towards K-12 teachers, I took away a renewed commitment to make learning as fun as possible. If we’re not having a good time, our students won’t either; if we’re bored, they’ll be bored too. Whether we’re opening the Scriptures, training our RAs, or teaching student development theory, we should be having a blast. So much so that it’s obvious and contagious.

I probably won’t bring action figures or Barbie dolls to class as Rollins suggests, but I’m considering the ways that play fits into our work with college students. On a practical level, I just may bring some play-doh the next time I teach counseling theory and I have some thoughts on how I may incorporate comic strips/graphic novels in a module on diversity.

The book also made me think about the time I brought a pogo stick to Senior EXIT. It was in the middle of the semester when the PA winter and the stress of classes had gotten the best of the students, and we all needed to release some tension. There’s nothing like a pogo stick to lighten the mood and let us have some fun before jumping into a serious topic.

Interestingly enough, my kids and I found that pogo stick in a trash pile in front of our neighbor’s house. I usually discourage my children from picking through junk piles during bulk trash week (I promise, they’ve never come home with a used mattress or anything like that). But this was a shiny thing of beauty with its 1990s decals still clinging to the metal. They don’t make ‘em like the used to. We snagged that treasure.

It may not be play-doh and pogo sticks for you, but how do you bring passion and play into your work with students? Teaching and learning with college students is an amazing privilege. I want my love for them and what I teach to shine through at each turn. This is not to say we won’t have bad days or times when we slog through or need to address tough stuff, but overall, our students should see us leading the way in our love for what we do. Because when we do, there’s all sorts of treasure to be found!

I’m curious, in what practical ways do you bring passion and play into your work with students? What makes it challenging for you to do so? Leave a comment below. I want to hear from you!  

Live Training Course!

If you viewed the last video, then you know I have something super exciting I want to share with you! 

It’s a special, limited-time opportunity that I can’t wait to tell you about: a live training course for practitioners (student affairs professionals, college ministers and church leaders) who want to equip students to thrive after college. 

Are you ready to take your efforts to the next level? Check out this page and act quickly. The course begins next week! There are only a limited number of seats and this offer is only good until this Friday at 11:59pm ET. 

5 “Must-Have” Features of the Best Interventions to Equip Students for Life After College

I’m excited to share the second video in this series!

If you’re wondering where to start or what to works towards, this next video covers 5 “must have” features we should include in any intervention to equip students for life after college.

I also touch on the question of “Who is responsible for our college seniors?” I’m curious what you think about that question as well as what feature(s) you might be implementing or planning to work towards.

Leave a comment below the video and let me know!

 

Why Equipping Students for Life After College Matters & How You Can Help

This is the first of series of videos for those who are serious about equipping students for life after college. In this video I get personal – see if you notice it before the reveal. 🙂 I also share why this matters – how intervening in the lives of students during the college years makes a difference in their transition…and beyond. Last, you’ll see one tip and one activity that you can use right away with students.