Why Equipping Students for Life After College Matters & How You Can Help

This is the first of series of videos for those who are serious about equipping students for life after college. In this video I get personal – see if you notice it before the reveal. 🙂 I also share why this matters – how intervening in the lives of students during the college years makes a difference in their transition…and beyond. Last, you’ll see one tip and one activity that you can use right away with students.

10 comments on “Why Equipping Students for Life After College Matters & How You Can Help

  • Pam VanPutten says:

    The discussion of self reflection is a key element for students to navigate during and after college. Many students have been following a fairly scripted path for themselves through the years. They are good at keeping their head down and getting the “grade”, but often have not learned to adapt or adjust to unforeseen circumstances. Life is often managing and finding joy in the journey, not just checking off the destination. Thanks so much, Erica for helping to navigate these discussions and provide resources!

    Reply
    • Erica Reitz says:

      GREAT point, Pam! I think it’s so important to give students permission to deviate from the cultural scripts they often feel they must follow as well as help them find joy in the ordinary spaces and places of life in the mundane (not just the mountaintop) — in the journey not just the checklist of the destination, as you as you say so well.

      Reply
  • Alex Sanjari says:

    I love this conversation! In addressing Seniors, I typically tell them that transitioning out of a community that has significantly shaped you (good, bad, or both) is real and it matters. I usually bring up a feeling they might be experiencing, but didn’t realize (i.e. how are you even supposed to say goodbye to a place like this?). I tell them that if they wanted my unsolicited advise, they should start small with a simple thank you note to staff and faculty that have made a difference in their life. That usually resonates with them and it’s also tangible, but not overwhelming (I tell them goodbye note and not goodbye letter for that reason haha).

    Reply
    • Erica Reitz says:

      This is excellent, Alex! I love that you’re helping students process the emotions that surround this transition (which many students don’t realize they have or may try to stuff/rush through because endings are hard). It’s so important to help students finish strong, and those notes to staff/faculty (or even lunch meetings/office drop-bys) are a great idea!

      Reply
  • Meghan E Craig says:

    Hey!
    I think the thing that stands out to me the most is having alumni come back and share about their experiences. I did this one semester at the beginning of each training, but I felt that it took up too much time. I didn’t think about doing it in a panel though! I love that! I would love the PDF you have of leading a panel of alumni. That is something that I can definitely do this semester!

    Reply
  • Garret White says:

    Thanks for the place to start! I love the reminder to begin with the questions, What is exciting, and what is scary about graduating? I will be using these with students.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>